Image Logo
 

Richmond Florence Study Center

 

 

The American International University in London
The Florence Study Center specializes in the study of studio and fine arts. Read more...
Header Image Right

Rules and Guidelines

Please read these instructions very carefully before you begin clicking on the blue button “Enroll now”

1. Please note that the Registration system is optimized for “Firefox”.

2. The email address you must type in the login page is the same you submitted to AIFS when you applied!

3. Please read the course descriptions thoroughly and pay attention to the course schedule, then click on the blue button “Enroll now” below to register for courses in Florence.

FALL & SPRING SEMESTERS STUDENTS ONLY

4. You can choose a maximum of six courses and a minimum of three courses including Italian language (which is mandatory).

5. Students can choose between the Standard (only for Italian language beginners) or the Intensive (open to all Italian Language levels students, from beginners to advanced and MANDATORY for students enrolled in the International Internship Program) options:

 - Intensive options: in the intensive option students take a mandatory 2-level 6-credit Italian course throughout the semester, starting at the appropriate level following the entrance test and progressing to a higher level during the semester. All student can choose a maximum of three 3-credit content courses. They may also choose an additional 1-credit optional introduction to Italian art course, taught primarily during the field trips to Rome and Venice.

 - Standard option(only for students who are beginners in Italian): in the standard option, students take a mandatory Italian Language course throughout the semester and can add a maximum of four 3-credit content courses. They may also choose an additional 1-credit optional introduction to Italian art course, taught primarily during the field trips to Rome and Venice.

6. ITALIAN LANGAUGE COURSE: In order to confirm your enrollment in any Italian language class higher than beginners (ITL 103+ 104 Elementary Italian I and II or ITL 103 – Elementary Italian I) you will be requested to take and pass a Placement Test by the given deadline, otherwise you will be placed in the beginner level. You will receive all the information on the Italian Language placement test after the end of the Registration Week.

Students who registered for ITL 103 + ITL 104 or ITL 103 do not need to take the Placement test.

7. If you are interested in learning Italian Language, please BE AWARE that the 3 credit Italian language course in (ITL 103) doesn’t expose you sufficiently to it!

8. In case the course/s you would like to take is/are closed because filled up, you can email us at library@richmond.it, in order to be added to the waiting list. Please note that this doesn’t guarantee you a spot in the above mentioned class!

9. All courses are capped at 25 students per course, except for Art History classes, capped at 24 and Art Studio classes that are capped at 15 students per course.

10. Please note that some courses may be doubled because oversubscribed, in this case the school will automatically assign you to the session that doesn’t conflict with your schedule.

11. For the courses that have an A or B session held at a different time, you have to choose the session that does not conflict with your schedule. The two sessions are exactly the same and they cannot be combined!

12. You will immediately receive a notification email for your pre-enrollment, keep it for reference. Please be aware that if you do not receive this notification email it means that: or you haven’t clicked on the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the Summary Information page or you have mistyped the alternative email address. In this case we recommend you contact us.

Once in Florence you will have to finalize your registration.

13. If you experience problems or if you feel you made an error please email us at library@richmond.it

ENROLLMENT DEADLINES


SemestreStartDateEndDate
Trial version09/05/2017 20:00:0010/05/2017 01:00:00
Spring 201418/11/2013 14:59:5925/11/2013 12:35:59
Fall 201613/06/2016 15:00:0017/06/2016 23:59:59
Spring 201707/11/2016 15:00:0011/11/2016 23:59:59
3 weeks (May 2016)04/04/2016 15:00:0007/04/2016 23:59:59
4 Weeks (June 2016)11/04/2016 15:00:0016/04/2016 23:59:59
3 weeks (May 2017)18/04/2017 15:00:0020/04/2017 23:59:59
4 Weeks (June 2017)02/05/2017 15:00:0006/05/2017 00:00:01
Fall 201712/06/2017 15:00:0016/06/2017 23:59:59
Test01/01/2017 08:00:0010/06/2017 23:00:00

Course Descriptions

With the exception of Italian language (which all students must take), courses are taught in English. A minimum enrollment of 10 is required for each course. Classes are held Monday to Friday.

CourseCodeCourseTitleCourseDescription
(3 Weeks -May ) ADM 3855/4855/5855Painting in Florence I/II/IIIADM 3855 - Painting in Florence I: This course teaches students how to produce the illusion of volume, space and movement on a two dimensional surface. Students explore hands-on approaches to paint application, colour, structure and composition, and experiment with different ways of applying the paint. They learn to imitate the techniques of painters such as Caravaggio, Monet, Seurat, Van Gogh and Picasso. This course includes classroom assignments and painting out of doors in places such as the Boboli gardens and the hills around Florence. Classroom assignments are also related to the city of Florence, and students work with their own photographic material. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and also prepares students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied for this course. ADM 4855 - Painting in Florence II: In this course, particular problems associated with tone and light are studied, including side lighting, candle lighting, and artificial lighting. Studio practice is combined with discussion, critique and demonstration. Students are encouraged to talk about their work with the instructor and fellow students to clarify their objectives and problems. The course includes open air painting and work in the studio. It follows on from ADM 3855 Painting in Florence I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5855 - Painting in Florence III: This is an advanced painting course, structured around specific painting projects to develop the range and technical competence of the student. Professional painting techniques are demonstrated and experimented with. There are advanced discussions of style, colour, form, composition and subject matter. This course includes outdoor painting and work in the studio. This course builds upon ADM 4855 Painting in Florence II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
(3 Weeks -May ) HST 5825Italian Food and CultureAccording to anthropologist Jon Holtzman, the tastes and flavours of a country’s traditional table are a meaningful representation of its collective memory. This course examines the geography, history and culture of Italian regional dishes that have brought Italy worldwide renown. The course looks at regional gastronomic traditions and their origins, including differences in how food is prepared, the representation of Italian food practices in media and cinema, food symbolism in Italian culture, food ethics and sustainable agriculture, with an examination of today’s fast and slow food traditions. A visit to a wine and olive oil farm in Tuscany will give a practical illustration of how resources are linked to food practices.
(3 Weeks -May ) MKT 5810Psychology of Fashion and Luxury GoodsConsumer psychology within the context of the consumption of fashion and luxury products and services is complex and is influenced by many factors. A thorough analysis and understanding of these factors allows organizations to plan effective marketing activities suitable to their target markets. This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services
(3 weeks -May) COM 5860Made in Italy: The symbols of Italian identity from Espresso to FerrariItaly occupies a prominent place in the world’s culture, history, and thought. This course will consider the history and practices of consumption in Italy, and the consumption of goods, products and services that have been encoded as ‘Italian’ outside the country itself. It analyses aspects of consumption (broadly defined) through a social, cultural, artistic and anthropological approach. Symbols of the ‘Italian-ness’ may include themes such as the transition to a consumer society, investigating areas such as advertising, fashion, industrial design, food culture and sport; and the impact of consumption in processes such as Italian identity formation and the construction of gender roles. The course includes on-site visits and two field trips, one to the Museum of Ferrari car factory and one to the Museum of Vespa scooter company.
ADM 3800/4800/5800Drawing I/II/IIIADM 3800 - Drawing I: This course introduces students to figure drawing, structure and object drawing, and outdoor drawing which includes the city of Florence/Rome and the Tuscan/surrounding landscape. Students experiment with lead, charcoal, conté pencil and crayon and ink. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and will also prepare students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 4800 - Drawing II: This course includes figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with the focus on Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to examine the problems of drawing the human figure (anatomy), perspective (several vanishing points) and objects (complexity, varied tonality). This course includes a consideration of the individual handling of traditional drawing techniques. It follows on from ADM 3800 Drawing I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5800 - Drawing III: This is an advanced drawing course, further developing students’ drawing skills. It focuses on figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with particular attention to the Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to further develop their personal style of composing and choosing types of lines and mark-making. Assignments are complex and narrative/illustrative, requiring a process-based approach, which students are asked to verbalize to their instructor and fellow students. This course follows on from and builds upon ADM 4800 Drawing II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3800/4800/5800 ADrawing I/II/IIIADM 3800 - Drawing I: This course introduces students to figure drawing, structure and object drawing, and outdoor drawing which includes the city of Florence/Rome and the Tuscan/surrounding landscape. Students experiment with lead, charcoal, conté pencil and crayon and ink. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and will also prepare students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 4800 - Drawing II: This course includes figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with the focus on Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to examine the problems of drawing the human figure (anatomy), perspective (several vanishing points) and objects (complexity, varied tonality). This course includes a consideration of the individual handling of traditional drawing techniques. It follows on from ADM 3800 Drawing I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5800 - Drawing III: This is an advanced drawing course, further developing students’ drawing skills. It focuses on figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with particular attention to the Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to further develop their personal style of composing and choosing types of lines and mark-making. Assignments are complex and narrative/illustrative, requiring a process-based approach, which students are asked to verbalize to their instructor and fellow students. This course follows on from and builds upon ADM 4800 Drawing II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3800/4800/5800 BDrawing I/II/IIIADM 3800 - Drawing I: This course introduces students to figure drawing, structure and object drawing, and outdoor drawing which includes the city of Florence/Rome and the Tuscan/surrounding landscape. Students experiment with lead, charcoal, conté pencil and crayon and ink. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and will also prepare students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 4800 - Drawing II: This course includes figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with the focus on Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to examine the problems of drawing the human figure (anatomy), perspective (several vanishing points) and objects (complexity, varied tonality). This course includes a consideration of the individual handling of traditional drawing techniques. It follows on from ADM 3800 Drawing I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5800 - Drawing III: This is an advanced drawing course, further developing students’ drawing skills. It focuses on figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing, with particular attention to the Florence and the Tuscan landscape. Students are encouraged to further develop their personal style of composing and choosing types of lines and mark-making. Assignments are complex and narrative/illustrative, requiring a process-based approach, which students are asked to verbalize to their instructor and fellow students. This course follows on from and builds upon ADM 4800 Drawing II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3855/4855/5855Painting in Florence I/II/IIIADM 3855 - Painting in Florence I: This course teaches students how to produce the illusion of volume, space and movement on a two dimensional surface. Students explore hands-on approaches to paint application, colour, structure and composition, and experiment with different ways of applying the paint. They learn to imitate the techniques of painters such as Caravaggio, Monet, Seurat, Van Gogh and Picasso. This course includes classroom assignments and painting out of doors in places such as the Boboli gardens and the hills around Florence. Classroom assignments are also related to the city of Florence, and students work with their own photographic material. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and also prepares students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied for this course. ADM 4855 - Painting in Florence II: In this course, particular problems associated with tone and light are studied, including side lighting, candle lighting, and artificial lighting. Studio practice is combined with discussion, critique and demonstration. Students are encouraged to talk about their work with the instructor and fellow students to clarify their objectives and problems. The course includes open air painting and work in the studio. It follows on from ADM 3855 Painting in Florence I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5855 - Painting in Florence III: This is an advanced painting course, structured around specific painting projects to develop the range and technical competence of the student. Professional painting techniques are demonstrated and experimented with. There are advanced discussions of style, colour, form, composition and subject matter. This course includes outdoor painting and work in the studio. This course builds upon ADM 4855 Painting in Florence II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3855/4855/5855 APainting in Florence I/II/IIIADM 3855 - Painting in Florence I: This course teaches students how to produce the illusion of volume, space and movement on a two dimensional surface. Students explore hands-on approaches to paint application, colour, structure and composition, and experiment with different ways of applying the paint. They learn to imitate the techniques of painters such as Caravaggio, Monet, Seurat, Van Gogh and Picasso. This course includes classroom assignments and painting out of doors in places such as the Boboli gardens and the hills around Florence. Classroom assignments are also related to the city of Florence, and students work with their own photographic material. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and also prepares students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied for this course. ADM 4855 - Painting in Florence II: In this course, particular problems associated with tone and light are studied, including side lighting, candle lighting, and artificial lighting. Studio practice is combined with discussion, critique and demonstration. Students are encouraged to talk about their work with the instructor and fellow students to clarify their objectives and problems. The course includes open air painting and work in the studio. It follows on from ADM 3855 Painting in Florence I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5855 - Painting in Florence III: This is an advanced painting course, structured around specific painting projects to develop the range and technical competence of the student. Professional painting techniques are demonstrated and experimented with. There are advanced discussions of style, colour, form, composition and subject matter. This course includes outdoor painting and work in the studio. This course builds upon ADM 4855 Painting in Florence II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 3855/4855/5855 BPainting in Florence I/II/IIIADM 3855 - Painting in Florence I: This course teaches students how to produce the illusion of volume, space and movement on a two dimensional surface. Students explore hands-on approaches to paint application, colour, structure and composition, and experiment with different ways of applying the paint. They learn to imitate the techniques of painters such as Caravaggio, Monet, Seurat, Van Gogh and Picasso. This course includes classroom assignments and painting out of doors in places such as the Boboli gardens and the hills around Florence. Classroom assignments are also related to the city of Florence, and students work with their own photographic material. The course is designed to provide a foundation in the subject, and also prepares students for the next course in the sequence. A studio fee is levied for this course. ADM 4855 - Painting in Florence II: In this course, particular problems associated with tone and light are studied, including side lighting, candle lighting, and artificial lighting. Studio practice is combined with discussion, critique and demonstration. Students are encouraged to talk about their work with the instructor and fellow students to clarify their objectives and problems. The course includes open air painting and work in the studio. It follows on from ADM 3855 Painting in Florence I and builds on the principles established in that course. A studio fee is levied on this course. ADM 5855 - Painting in Florence III: This is an advanced painting course, structured around specific painting projects to develop the range and technical competence of the student. Professional painting techniques are demonstrated and experimented with. There are advanced discussions of style, colour, form, composition and subject matter. This course includes outdoor painting and work in the studio. This course builds upon ADM 4855 Painting in Florence II. A studio fee is levied on this course.
ADM 5860Photography for the mediaRecommended for communications and journalism majors as well as photographers, this course develops knowledge and experience in photojournalism via the study of the work of major practitioners and the production of assignments typical of today’s photojournalists. Students will need to provide a DSRL (digital reflex) camera and a laptop (with any basic photo editing software). There is a studio fee for this course. Prerequisites: ADM 3160
ADM 5870Sketchbook of FlorenceThis course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the role of drawing as an investigative process as well as an expressive means of communication. Drawing is used as a basic exploratory tool to examine Florence as the site for both subject – in particular, the river Arno - and as a research resource for the practice of drawing - especially in the Florentine Galleries and Museums. The course is divided between working in the studio and on location in Florence. The sketchbook is an essential aspect of the course in helping students to document the city, stimulate and develop ideas and as a reminder that drawing is a portable medium. A studio fee is levied on this course. Prerequisites: ADM 3800 Drawing I An introductory Drawing class.
AVC 4800Introduction to Italian ArtThis course examines developments in early Italian painting and sculpture leading up to the Renaissance and Baroque. Students consider early Italian art from the Etruscans and Romans up to the Renaissance, in art historical context, particularly in terms of patronage and the key social, religious and philosophical events. It is normally taught during field study visits, which include Lucca, Pisa, Venice, and Rome. A field project paper is normally required.
AVC 4805 Early Renaissance Florentine artThis course focuses on examples of Florentine art around 1400-1490: the foundation of the Renaissance style, and the emergence and development of Florentine Romanesque Gothic architecture, painting and sculpture. Students will study the period of Lorenzo the Magnificent, the golden age of Florentine art and culture. Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Filippo Lippi and Fra Angelico are examined in detail. Most of the classes are taught in Florentine museums and churches. A course-related field trip to Pisa and Lucca is included. Students will need to budget for admission to museums and galleries, which is not included in the course fee.
AVC 5805 High Renaissance art. This course considers painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy from the 14th to the 16th centuries, with particular reference to the cultural context of Rome alongside the contributions of Florence and Venice. Much of the course is normally taught on-site, allowing students to gain first-hand experience of work by Bramante, Raphael and Michelangelo within their historical and urban contexts. The course focuses on how artistic expression responded to a rapidly changing society; in particular, it explores key artists and their patrons at the beginning of the 16th century in Rome - at that time the leading cultural capital of the Western world. Prerequisites: AVC 4200 Introduction to Art Across Cultures or AVC 4205 Introduction to Visual Culture or HST 3200 World Cultural History or GEP 4180 Research and Writing II
123456

 
Privacy Statement © 2012 Richmond of London - Florence Study Center.